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Hammer vs. Evil D. in Soulfire [Sega Mega CD - Cancelled]

Hammer vs. Evil D. in Soulfire [Sega Mega CD - Cancelled]

Hammer vs. Evil D. in Soulfire” is a cancelled action game based on MC Hammer, an American rapper most popular during the late 1980s until the mid-1990s. The game was in development by GTE Entertainment and it would have been published by Sega for their Mega CD add-on for the Genesis / Mega Drive, but for some reasons it was never released. We don’t even know much about “Hammer vs. Evil D. in Soulfire”‘s gameplay and only a short video can be seen in the videos below (second one at 03:45). If you know someone that worked on this game, please let us know!

Thanks to myfishbone and Calvin  for the contribution! First video from GrooveRaider‘s “Sega Welcome To The Next Level 1994″ video.

Videos:

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monokoma

Editor in Chief at Unseen 64
I'm an Italian gamer with not enough free time to play as much as i'd like to and sadly not enough time to write about cancelled and beta games. Founder of Unseen64 in 2001, i'd like to sleep more than 5 hours a day, but i have to pay the bills. I'm currently working as a SEO Copywriter and Content Editor for various italian websites, you can add me on Google Plus, Last FM or contact me by email.

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6 thoughts on “Hammer vs. Evil D. in Soulfire [Sega Mega CD - Cancelled]

  1. Youloute

    the game has been announced during the summer CES of Chicago in 1992 and was still on the planning in 1993 september under the name “Hammer”.
    I think it’s not a Virtual VCR game since it was developped by BTE Interactive.
    By the way, the “teaser” is the video clip “If Legit, no quit”, featuring James Brown.

  2. Sargeant Philips

    I was lead dev on this game, and you didn’t really show the best clip either. That has to be Hammer converting looters to posse members by infusing them with SoulFire(tm). This was a great game for the SegaCD tech, a bastardized Genesis with a CD player bolted to the top, and getting video to play through the crazy DMA scheme at all was a major achievement. Sadly, our licensing agreement to get Hammer video failed for the most part and we had to replace with horrible stock footage.

    The highlight of the development was meeting Hammer, he’s a genius poet and a technically gifted game designer in his own right.

    For more stories, hit me back…

  3. Calvin Gardner

    To Sargeant Phillips, I’d really like to learn more about the game. I’m the one who posted the game footage to YouTube (I extracted it from another YouTuber’s video from a Winter CES Sega showcase of 1994). There was literally no other gameplay footage of this game but I remember reading about this game being announced when I was 8 years old and a MC Hammer fan (still am lol). Sure wish it was released because I’d still love to play the game even today. It always seemed like a cool, unique game.

  4. patrick Matzke

    To Sargeant Phillips, I’d like to know more also. I remember seeing this announced in a gaming mag with a screenshot back in the day, and wanted to play it. Why was the game cancelled? I’d love to see more footage of it if any more exists.

  5. Sargeant Phillips

    Sorry about the late reply… Hmm… Well, pls email me at posinator at yahoo dot com for more info, and I’ll tell you as much as I can remember.

    I know we were trying to make something as fun as MJ Moonwalker, but let’s just say the design “drifted” a bit.

    More footage, I definitely have that…

    The premise of the game was that the player, as Hammer, could convert lost souls to posse members. Of course, the game had to show lost souls, and I think Sega lost it when they saw one character (black guy) carrying a stolen TV set across the street.

    Hammer could turn him into a posse member by shooting “soul-fire” at him. All the animation was synchronized to the soundtrack (Hammer of course) so everyone danced and walked “to the beat”. All the code was written in 100% assembly language or hand-optimized C code. It ran on 3 processors, and I had 3 computers each with In Circuit Emulators all running different code-bases. As a technological / computer-exercise, it’s probably the best pure coding I’ve ever done.

    -SP

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